Geographic Information Systems

Welcome to Geographic Information Systems at Kauai Community College!

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a computerized system used to determining tsunami evacuation zones, monitoring tiger sharks, mapping invasive species or serial crimes are all applications that use Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

GIS lets us visualize, question, analyze and interpret data to understand relationships, patterns and trends. 

GIS can show many different kinds of data on one map. This enables people to more easily see, analyze, and understand patterns and relationships.

With GIS technology, people can compare the locations of different things in order to discover how they relate to each other. For example, using GIS, the same map could include sites that produce pollution, such as gas stations, and sites that are sensitive to pollution, such as wetlands. Such a map would help people determine which wetlands are most at risk.

GIS can use any information that includes location. The location can be expressed in many different ways, such as latitude and longitude, address, or ZIP code. Many different types of information can be compared and contrasted using GIS. The system can include data about people, such as population, income, or education level. It can include information about the land, such as the location of streams, different kinds of vegetation, and different kinds of soil. It can include information about the sites of factories, farms, and schools, or storm drains, roads, and electric power lines.

Data and GIS

Data in many different forms can be entered into GIS. Data that are already in map form can be included in GIS. This includes such information as the location of rivers and roads, hills and valleys.  Digital, or computerized, data can also be entered into GIS. An example of this kind of information is data collected by satellites that show land use—the location of farms, towns, or forests. GIS can also include data in table form, such as population information. GIS technology allows all these different types of information, no matter their source or original format, to be overlaid on top of one another on a single map.

Putting information into GIS is called data capture. Data that are already in digital form, such as images taken by satellites and most tables, can simply be uploaded into GIS. Maps must be scanned, or converted into digital information.

GIS must make the information from all the various maps and sources align, so they fit together. One reason this is necessary is because maps have different scales. A scale is the relationship between the distance on a map and the actual distance on Earth. GIS combines the information from different sources in such a way that it all has the same scale. 

Often, GIS must also manipulate the data because different maps have different projections. A projection is the method of transferring information from Earth’s curved surface to a flat piece of paper or computer screen. No projection can copy the reality of Earth’s curved surface perfectly. Different types of projections accomplish this task in different ways, but all result in some distortion. To transfer a curved, three-dimensional shape onto a flat surface inevitably requires stretching some parts and squeezing other parts. A world map can show either the correct sizes of countries or their correct shapes, but it can’t do both. GIS takes data from maps that were made using different projections and combines them so all the information can be displayed using one common projection.

Content on this page is from National Geographic

PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • Placement in ENG 100

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:

A GPA of 2.0 or higher for all courses applicable toward the certificate or degree is needed to meet graduation requirements.

PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1.  Analyze and describe contemporary and interdisciplinary geographical representation, with a focus on social and environmental management issues.
  2. Apply acquired knowledge and skills, incorporating geographic perspectives into their major fields of specialization.
  3. Critically analyze the specific advancements of geographical representation, and support geographic decisions and the furthering of geographic scientific and technological knowledge, especially related to the presentation of geographic mapping across cultures and through time, and assessing theories and assumptions about mapping and decision-making that relate to the student's particular academic focus.
  4. Illustrate critical thinking skills in decision-making that reflect ethical and professional understandings of geographic mapping.
  5. Describe and analyze the politics and influences of geographical representation.
  6. Construct maps utilizing digital techniques, computer assisted design (CAD), database development, and map design.
  7. Communicate successfully orally and in writing in Standard American English, and interpret, and/or express themselves in, some other form of communication at a basic level, whether from knowledge of a second language or through artistic or symbolic expression.
  8. Analyze and demonstrate quantitative methods appropriately, based upon a scientific understanding of the physical and natural world, and an understanding of the mathematics of digitized geographical representation.

GUIDED PATHWAYS TO COMPLETION

Please click on the degree or certificate name to expand the tab to read

Geographic Information Systems Certificate of Competence, 6 credits

Fall Semester 1

  • GIS 189 - GIS, Mapping and Society, 3 credits
  • GIS 200 - Interpreting and Creating GIS Maps, 3 credits
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Total Credits 6

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Advanced Geographic Information Systems Certificate of Competence, 16 credits
 
Fall Semester 1
  • GIS 189 - GIS, Mapping and Society, 3 credits
  • GIS 200 - Interpreting and Creating GIS Maps, 3 credits

Spring Semester 1

  • GIS 205 - Database Design and Programming, 3 credits
  • GIS 205L - Database Design and Programming, 1 credits

Fall semester 2

  • GIS 213 - Advanced Geospatial Techniques, 3 credits
  • GIS 214 - Practicum in GIS, 3 credits

Total Credits 16

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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a computerized system used to determining tsunami evacuation zones, monitoring tiger sharks, mapping invasive species or serial crimes are all applications that use Geographic Information Systems (GIS).